News and Events

Child Poverty: Political Party Responses to Campaign 2000

Today is the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty and in four days, polls will open for Canada’s 43rd federal election.

This year also marks 30 years since each federal party represented in the House of Commons committed to ending child poverty by the year 2000. There is no better time than the October 21 election to hold every party accountable to that commitment. Campaign 2000 sent an open letter to the leaders of every registered federal party asking to see their plans on eradicating child and family poverty in Canada. 

Since the all-party resolution was passed 30 years ago, Campaign 2000 has been developing a suite of achievable policy recommendations to put Canada on the track to eradicating child and family poverty.  These recommendations were outlined in our letter and each party was asked to respond directly to questions based on the recommendations. Nine responses were received, and of those, only one party, the Green Party, responded directly to the questions. The Liberal Party and NDP were the only other two parties who provided substantive responses related to poverty reduction.

Our report, Child Poverty by Federal Riding: the work ahead for Canada’s next Parliament, shows significant levels of child poverty in every federal riding across the country.  Child poverty is an everyday issue, and with the looming federal election, we have the opportunity to make it an election issue as well. Ending poverty must be a priority for all members of the incoming government.

Read our full statement here

Read the response from the Green Party here

Read the response from the Liberal Party here

Read the response from the New Democrat Party here

New Report: Child Poverty by Federal Riding

In the lead up to the federal election, Campaign 2000 has mapped the prevalence of child poverty by federal riding from coast to coast to coast.  The interactive map, produced in partnership with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and this corresponding report is the second update to the initial 2015 report.  Using the most recent data available, this interactive map shows the rate of child poverty by federal electoral district along with socio-economic indicators, allowing users to get a snapshot of state of child poverty by federal riding.  Readers can also view demographic characteristics that are associated with high poverty rates in each riding.

This update shows that while there is an important trend downwards in the rate of child poverty across the country since 2015, a significant number of children remain in poverty in every federal riding across Canada.  The latest data continue to paint a stark portrait of inequality with high- and low-income families living in close proximity while divided by wide social and economic gaps that leave too many children hungry, sick and stressed beyond what is expected or acceptable for children.

Federal ridings with the highest levels of child and family poverty are home to a higher proportion of Indigenous, racialized and immigrant community members and lone parent led families.  This correlation signals the persistence of discrimination and systemic inequalities that drive higher unemployment, lower labour market participation rates and higher proportions of renters and people spending more than 30% of their income on housing.

The presence of child and family poverty in every riding in Canada demands for it to be a priority issue for every party this election, with a commitment to strong and decisive federal action.  Clearly, every community, every candidate and all political parties have a stake in the eradication of poverty.

Read the press release and the Child poverty by federal riding: the work ahead for Canada’s next Parliament report. Click on the map below to see the rate of child poverty in your riding. Read the list of the best and worst ridings.

Talk to your local candidates about how they will work to end child and family poverty in your riding.  Read our letter to federal party leaders to see what we asked.
Read the Toronto Star exclusive: Report aims to put poverty on the agenda in federal election campaign

Child and Family Poverty priorities for Election 2019

As voters head to the polls this fall, Campaign 2000 wants to ensure that ending child and family poverty is responded to as a key issue by all parties.  Today our National Steering Committee sent an open letter to the leaders of each registered federal party leader on behalf of our 120+ partners.  We asked them a series of questions based on Campaign 2000’s recommendations that will give party leaders an opportunity to describe their party’s priority and approach to the issue of child and family poverty.  We will post all responses, including non responses, here so stay tuned.  Click here to read the letter.

Government Urged to Step Up Poverty Legislation in Open Letter

Campaign 2000 and partners at the Dignity for All Campaign have sent an open letter to Minister Jean-Yves Duclos with recommendations to strengthen Bill C-87, An Act respecting the reduction of poverty. This is in anticipation of the federal government’s legislation of Canada’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (CPRS).

Read our Media Release for more details.  To download a copy of the latest Open Letter, please visit: https://dignityforall.ca/open-letter-strengthen-canadas-poverty-reduction-bill/

2018 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty

In advance of the 30th year of the 1989 all-party commitment to eliminate child poverty by the year 2000, Campaign 2000 calls on the federal government to be more ambitious in its poverty reduction targets and timelines. The coalition commends the government on the first steps taken to reduce poverty but encourages bolder action to ensure Canadians do not have to wait another generation to see the end of child poverty.

Released on November 20th, National Child Day, the 2018 national report card “Bold Ambitions for Child Poverty Eradication in Canada,” provides a current snapshot of child and family poverty and demonstrates the need for a costed implementation plan to eradicate child poverty in this generation.

Ahead of the 2019 federal election, Campaign 2000 invites all parties to commit to the missing piece in Canada’s anti-poverty agenda: universal childcare. Without affordable, accessible, and quality childcare, parents cannot lift themselves and their children out of poverty.

Six Campaign 2000 provincial partners are also releasing their annual report cards on child and family poverty today – all are calling for bold action against poverty. Click on the following links to read and download the new report cards and other materials as they become available:

National Report in  English and French

Media release in English and French

Infographics: report card overview, childcare and inequality

Ontario Child Poverty Infographics & Media Release, November 2018

Please click on the Media Release and five infographics listed below:

Ontario Campaign 2000 Media Release, Nov. 2018

Poverty Hurts Ontario

Income Security

Workers’ Rights

Universal Childcare

Affordable Housing

Reference List

Other provincial reports and support materials

Prince Edward Island Report Card, November 2018

New Brunswick Report Card, November 2018

Manitoba Report Card in 2018 (forthcoming in December)

Saskatchewan Report Card, November 2018

Alberta Report Card, November 2018

British Columbia Report Card, November 2018

 

Response to the Poverty Reduction Strategy

Campaign 2000 welcomed the August 21 release of Opportunity for All: Canada’s First Poverty Reduction Strategy but also expressed disappointment that the strategy’s long-term goal of reducing poverty by 50% by 2030 means another generation of children – approximately 600,000 – will grow up in poverty. The Campaign 2000 coalition will continue to call for greater investments to accelerate reductions in poverty given 4.8 million Canadians suffer poverty today.

Read the full response from Campaign 2000.

Campaign 2000 Pre-Budget Submission

On August 3, Campaign 2000 submitted its priorities for the 2019 federal budget. According to the submission, eradicating poverty, to ensure every person in Canada the opportunity to succeed and live in dignity, is the right thing to do for children and for all of us. Right now, 4.8 million Canadians suffer the indignity, hunger, insecurity, stress and social exclusion of poverty.   Eradicating poverty is undoubtedly essential to promoting Canada’s economic growth and competitiveness as found by the Conference Board of Canada while promoting population health, enhancing social cohesion and enabling fuller social and economic participation of all Canadians.

Learn more about Campaign 2000’s priorities for the 2019 federal budget here.

 

Child Poverty by Federal Ridings

In the lead up to Canada’s first federal Poverty Reduction Strategy, Campaign 2000 reveals a disturbing picture of the magnitude of child poverty in every federal riding. The latest data paint a stark portrait of inequality in Canada with high- and low-income families living in close proximity while divided by wide social and economic gaps that leave too many children hungry, sick and stressed beyond their years.

Troublingly, this report shows that the federal ridings with the highest levels of child and family poverty are home to a higher proportion of Indigenous, racialized and immigrant communities and lone-parent led families. This correlation signals the persistence of discrimination and systemic inequalities that translate to higher unemployment, lower labour market participation rates and higher proportions of renters and people spending more than 30% of their income on housing.

The presence of child and family poverty in every riding in Canada demands strong and decisive federal action through the Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS). Clearly, every community, every Member of Parliament and all political parties have a stake in the eradication of poverty.

What is the child poverty rate in your riding?

Mapping Child Poverty

Campaign 2000 Recognizes Volunteers

In recognition of National Volunteer Week, Campaign 2000 extends a special thanks to our vital and dedicated volunteers! Volunteers provide leadership, guidance and expertise to all of Campaign 2000’s activities.

Our volunteers help power the anti-poverty movement in Canada by raising public awareness of poverty and its consequences and advocating for social justice from coast to coast to coast. We are privileged to work with volunteers that include parents, youth and children in low income; partner groups; advisors and  steering committee members from across Canada.

Your dedication to the goal of eradicating child and family poverty keeps our network strong, vibrant and effective at building policies and programs supportive of low income children and families. Happy Volunteer Week!

Budget 2018 Response

According to Campaign 2000, Budget 2018 makes inroads against poverty and inequality with boosts to Canadians’ incomes, but the gains for parents, women, workers and Indigenous people need to be poverty-proofed and paired with accessible public services in the upcoming Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS). We note that the absence of meaningful child care funding is glaring in the context of the commitment to gender equality from this government.

“Budget 2018’s inroads are in the right direction, but with a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy the federal government can truly go the distance for children and their families,” says Anita Khanna, Campaign 2000’s National Coordinator. “With nearly 1 in 5 children in poverty, Canada needs to take the training wheels off in 2019 and roll out the strong investments in poverty eradication that Canadians have awaited for far too long.”

Read our full response. See Canada Child Benefit infographic.

Budget 2018 in the news:
CBC: Budget 2018: Highlights of Bill Morneau’s ‘equality + growth’ budget
Government of Canada: Budget 2018